Features 3 minutes 15 February 2022

MICHELIN Guide Tokyo 2022 MICHELIN Green Star restaurants

8 new MICHELIN Green Stars awarded in Tokyo

Green Stars Tokyo Michelin Guide Asia

The MICHELIN Tokyo 2022 has awarded MICHELIN Green Stars to 14 restaurants, including 8 newly listed restaurants in Tokyo.
In recent years, environmental conservation activities and moves towards a sustainable future have been attracting attention from around the world. Along with assessing the quality of the cooking, the Michelin Guide highlights those chefs and restaurants that are serious about sustainable gastronomy and therefore a more sustainable society with MICHELIN Green Stars.


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FARO (1 MICHELIN Star, Italian)
New MICHELIN Green Star
Chef Kotaro NODA’s cooking philosophy is to establish harmony with nature. He expresses this sustainable gastronomy by transforming vegetables into beautiful dishes. He serves vegan meals in order to reduce demand for livestock, which place a tremendous burden on the global environment. (Photo by FARO)

©FARO/ ‘Stuffed Cabbage’ is the main dish of the Gastronomy Vegan Set Menu. It features homemade vegan cheese made from green peas and cashews, fermented cabbage is topped with the super food amaranthus, and is served with a homemade geranium kombucha sauce.
©FARO/ ‘Stuffed Cabbage’ is the main dish of the Gastronomy Vegan Set Menu. It features homemade vegan cheese made from green peas and cashews, fermented cabbage is topped with the super food amaranthus, and is served with a homemade geranium kombucha sauce.
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Sazenka (3 MICHELIN Stars, Chineses)
New MICHELIN Green Star
Tomoya KAWADA’s comprehensive approach to contributing to the environment includes being conscious of marine resource depletion, using wild game and bringing in composting. He engages in sustainable activities from a food standpoint in order to conserve resources. (Photo by Sazenka)

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©Sazenka / Dried grilled fish made from usually scrapped fish

Den (2 MICHELIN Stars, Japanese)
New MICHELIN Green Star
Respect for nature forms the basis of Japanese cuisine, and in this spirit Zaiyu HASEGAWA engages in contemporary cooking, collaborating with producers who are conscious of their impact on the natural environment. Another expression of the Japanese mentality of avoiding waste is his use of recycled materials in the restaurant’s interior and furniture. (Photo by Den)

©Den
©Den
©MICHELIN_Den / Left: ‘Den Salad’ featuring organic vegetables. Right: The interior features out-of-specification timber.
©MICHELIN_Den / Left: ‘Den Salad’ featuring organic vegetables. Right: The interior features out-of-specification timber.
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Crony (2 MICHELIN Stars, French)
New MICHELIN Green Star
Chef Michihiro HARUTA selects sustainable seafood so as to preserve the ocean’s resources. From the standpoint of food loss, he uses imperfect vegetables and leftover sake lees. He puts sustainability into practice throughout the restaurant, which includes giving preference to fair trade products, and smoking ingredients with wood chips that would otherwise be thrown out. (Photo by Crony)

©Crony / ‘Japanese Sake Sourdough Bread & Sake Lees Whipped Buttere’, a dish made with usually scrapped sake lees.
©Crony / ‘Japanese Sake Sourdough Bread & Sake Lees Whipped Buttere’, a dish made with usually scrapped sake lees.

Nœud. TOKYO (1 MICHELIN Star, French)
New MICHELIN Green Star
Sustainability is emphasised in everything from the food to the interior and service. Care for the natural environment is engaged in in many ways, including reducing food loss, avoiding beef and choosing sustainable seafood. (Photo by Nœud. TOKYO)


©Noeud. Tokyo /Left: Naoto NAKATSUKA, and Akiyoshi TANAKA, a plasterer from Kyoto. Right: The earthen exterior wall uses recycled clay from an Edo-period storehouse. The wall was made using the rammed-earth technique, with just clay and a small amount of lime.
©Noeud. Tokyo /Left: Naoto NAKATSUKA, and Akiyoshi TANAKA, a plasterer from Kyoto. Right: The earthen exterior wall uses recycled clay from an Edo-period storehouse. The wall was made using the rammed-earth technique, with just clay and a small amount of lime.
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Ma Cuisine (Bib Gourmand, French)
New MICHELIN Green Star
Chef Ryosuke IKEJIRI strives for sustainability together with producers in Tokushima, his approach being based on the philosophy of local production for local consumption that he learned in France. He visits farms and fishing ports to seek possibilities for local ingredients and teaches local elementary school students about ethical consumption. (Photo by Ma Cuisine)

©Ma Cuisine / Left to right: A scene from a class held at Takashi Elementary School in Tokushima. The menu includes Tokushima specialities like ‘Marinated Sardines’ and ‘Rib P’tit Salé and Lentil Stew’.
©Ma Cuisine / Left to right: A scene from a class held at Takashi Elementary School in Tokushima. The menu includes Tokushima specialities like ‘Marinated Sardines’ and ‘Rib P’tit Salé and Lentil Stew’.

La Paix (1 MICHELIN Star, French)
New MICHELIN Green Star
Chef Ippei MATSUMOTO works with fishermen and farmers to choose environmentally friendly ingredients. He considers it his mission to leave the next generation with bountiful food resources and develops gastronomy for a sustainable future. (Photo by La Paix)

©La Paix / Left: Ippei MATSUMOTO, and Toyota, a peach farmer from Wakayama. Peaches are difficult to use, but MATSUMOTO was impressed with Toyota’s commitment to steering clear of agricultural chemicals and makes the peaches part of his set menu. Right: One example is the ‘La Paix Summer Festival Goldfish’.
©La Paix / Left: Ippei MATSUMOTO, and Toyota, a peach farmer from Wakayama. Peaches are difficult to use, but MATSUMOTO was impressed with Toyota’s commitment to steering clear of agricultural chemicals and makes the peaches part of his set menu. Right: One example is the ‘La Paix Summer Festival Goldfish’.
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L'OSIER (3 MICHELIN Stars, French)
New MICHELIN Green Star
Starting with Chef Olivier CHAIGNON, the whole restaurant is geared towards sustainability. The aim is to produce food that is safe for both people and the planet by procuring environmentally friendly ingredients and partnering with producers, among other initiatives. (Photo by L'OSIER)


NARISAWA (2 MICHELIN Stars, Innovative)


Yoshihiro NARISAWA

❝The theme here is ‘coexisting with forests’, and we express environmental sustainability and food safety in our dishes. We visit depopulated mountain villages every year to plant trees and clean up, because we believe it is the duty of a chef to not only prepare food, but to preserve the wilderness ecosystem.❞

©NARISAWA / Left: Yoshihiro NARISAWA planting trees. Right: The ‘Hometown Scenery: Essence of the Forest’ speciality.
©NARISAWA / Left: Yoshihiro NARISAWA planting trees. Right: The ‘Hometown Scenery: Essence of the Forest’ speciality.
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Quintessence (3 MICHELIN Stars, French)



Shuzo KISHIDA

❝We are deeply concerned about the depletion of marine resources in Japan, a maritime nation. To promote sustainability, we serve as representative of an organisation whose aim is conservation. We contribute to ocean sustainability by not using juvenile fish that are overfished.❞ (Photo by Quintessence)

Sincère (1 MICHELIN Star, French)



Shinsuke ISHII

❝We engage in activities and communication to protect the marine ecosystem and the environment, out of consideration for the future of marine resources. We procure seafood caught using line fishing or gill nets and build relationships with producers that practice small-scale, sustainable fishing.❞ (Photo by Sincère)



©Sincère
©Sincère
©Sincère / Sea Bass in Puff Pastry’—sea bass being a sustainable seafood.
©Sincère / Sea Bass in Puff Pastry’—sea bass being a sustainable seafood.
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Florilège (2 MICHELIN Stars, French)



Hiroyasu KAWATE

❝Food sustainability is a goal we are working towards, with the focus on food loss. Our signature dish, ‘Sustainability, Beef’, uses beef from cows that have had at least one calf, and seeks to fuse sustainability and gastronomy. We create new value with dishes using ingredients that would otherwise be thrown away.❞ (Photo by Florilège)


© Florilège / ‘Sustainability Beef’, a dish made from the meat of delivered cows.
© Florilège / ‘Sustainability Beef’, a dish made from the meat of delivered cows.

LATURE (1 MICHELIN Star, French)



Takuto MUROTA

❝Our theme is ‘coexistence and harmony with nature’. In our dishes we make use of deer and boar, which have become overpopulated due to human activities. In Chiba, we opened Lature Nature Farm. The vegetables are grown in an environmentally friendly way, and every part is used.❞ (Photo by LATURE)



©LATURE / Takuto Murota does both hunting and cooking himself. ‘Deer Blood Macaroon’ is a dish expressing his respect for wild game.
©LATURE / Takuto Murota does both hunting and cooking himself. ‘Deer Blood Macaroon’ is a dish expressing his respect for wild game.

L'Effervescence (3 MICHELIN Stars, French)



Shinobu NAMAE

❝We use domestic ingredients exclusively to ensure survival of producers and reduce food mileage. We do not use fish that are endangered. By using thinned wood, we reduce the emission of CO2 and contribute to forest revitalisation.❞ (Photo by L'Effervescence )



©LEffervescence
©LEffervescence
©LEffervescence / Left: ‘Artisan Vegetables’. Right: ‘Turnip—Cooked Elaborately, Presented Simply’. Choice ingredients from all over Japan.
©LEffervescence / Left: ‘Artisan Vegetables’. Right: ‘Turnip—Cooked Elaborately, Presented Simply’. Choice ingredients from all over Japan.

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