Michelin Star Revelation 3 minutes 06 October 2022

2022 New York MICHELIN Stars

The stars are shining brightly over New York City, with 19 MICHELIN-Starred restaurants joining the 2022 MICHELIN Guide New York.

New York City Brooklyn Manhattan Ed's Pick Michelin Stars

The 2022 MICHELIN Guide New York has 19 new MICHELIN-Starred restaurants in Brooklyn and Manhattan, from a tiny tasting menu operation in Brooklyn Heights to pan-Asian with splendid desserts in Midtown West. Read on to find out who's joining the guide, and click here to see every MICHELIN-Starred restaurant in New York. Bon appétit!

Two MICHELIN Stars

Al Coro (Chelsea)
Cuisine: Italian
Chef Melissa Rodriguez is back at this long-awaited spot. The dining room sets the stage for a kitchen that dances behind the curtain, reveling in the unexpected and sidestepping tradition for a fixed menu of modern Italian dishes with subtle nods to New York.

Al Coro © Natalie Black/Al Coro
Al Coro © Natalie Black/Al Coro

SAGA (Financial District)
Cuisine: Contemporary 
SAGA is the crown of 70 Pine Street, a landmark tower that rises over 60 stories. Chef James Kent never allows his cuisine to be overshadowed by the setting, however. Along with his talented team, he presents diners with compositions that embrace luxury, seasonality and urbane inspiration.

SAGA © Peter Marquez/SAGA
SAGA © Peter Marquez/SAGA

One MICHELIN Star

Clover Hill (Brooklyn Heights)
Cuisine: Contemporary
On a quiet, residential street in Brooklyn Heights, talented chef Charlie Mitchell cooks with irresistible suaveness and confidence, making the most out of top-rate ingredients, delicious sauces and thoughtful combinations.

Clover Hill © Signe Birck/Clover Hill
Clover Hill © Signe Birck/Clover Hill

Dirt Candy (Lower East Side)
Cuisine: Vegetarian
Chef Amanda Cohen was an advocate of vegetable- and plant-based cooking long before it was cool, and her Lower East Side flagship continues to flourish as a pioneer in ethical eating with refined technique. A single tasting menu yields a breadth of dishes that never masquerade as meat.

Dirt Candy © Evan Sung/Dirt Candy
Dirt Candy © Evan Sung/Dirt Candy

Frevo (Greenwich Village)
Cuisine: Contemporary
Frevo is that rare restaurant that flies just under the radar but deserves to be in the spotlight, as Chef Franco Sampogna and his team have serious resumes. It's a tasting menu-only spot that doubles as a gallery. The small scale only adds to its exclusivity. Watch as the crew plates contemporary French dishes with a keen eye toward texture.

Frevo © Diane Kang/Frevo
Frevo © Diane Kang/Frevo

Icca (Tribeca)
Cuisine: Japanese/Sushi
Chef counters are a treat, but a seat in front of chef Kazushige Suzuki feels like a best-kept secret. The room has a presence of its own, notable in scale and hidden away in the back past a cocktail bar. The chef sources fish entirely from Japan and keeps his nigiri traditional.

Icca © Evan Sung/Icca
Icca © Evan Sung/Icca

Joomak Banjum (Koreatown)
Cuisine: Asian
What started out as a homegrown pop-up has evolved into this handsome, brick-and-mortar operation at the edge of Koreatown. Chef Jiho Kim and pastry maven Kelly Nam merge global flavors on their approachable tasting that riffs on familiar dishes like jajangmyeon, made here with squid ink-sourdough noodles.

Joomak Banjum © Signe Birck/Joomak Banjum
Joomak Banjum © Signe Birck/Joomak Banjum

L'Abeille (Tribeca)
Cuisine: French
Chef Mitsunobu Nagae is a calm, collected presence in the open kitchen, and years spent working at Joël Robuchon restaurants worldwide are evident. A harmonious union of French cooking with Japanese sensibilities, Nagae’s food is immediately approachable.

L'Abeille © Nicole Franzen/L'Abeille
L'Abeille © Nicole Franzen/L'Abeille

Le Pavillon (Midtown East)
Cuisine: French
Chef Daniel Boulud has done it again, fashioning a room that makes the well-heeled feel right at home. Chefs Michael Balboni and Will Nacev head the kitchen which skillfully prepares a contemporary, globally inflected carte dominated by seafood and vegetable-focused items.

Le Pavillon © Thomas Schauer/Le Pavillon
Le Pavillon © Thomas Schauer/Le Pavillon

Mari (Hell's Kitchen)
Cuisine: Korean
Mari, which means “roll” in Korean, is Hell’s Kitchen’s latest destination from the talented Sungchul Shim, who made a name for himself at Kochi, just down the street. The chef reimagines the hand roll genre as a tasting menu primed with top-notch ingredients and Korean flavors.

Mari © Daniel Ahn/Mari
Mari © Daniel Ahn/Mari

Noz 17 (Chelsea)
Cuisine: Japanese/Sushi
This little den is helmed by Chef Junichi Matsuzaki, and the chef's precise, seasonally driven omakase offers an array of robust otsumami, sashimi and nigiri.

Noz 17 © Hannah Wyatt/Noz 17
Noz 17 © Hannah Wyatt/Noz 17

Oiji Mi (Flatiron)
Cuisine: Korean
Practice does make perfect, evidenced by chef Brian Kim and his team, who honed their modern Korean cuisine at the now-shuttered Oiji before moving uptown to open Oiji Mi. This time, they've delivered a notch above, with a sleek space attended to by a fleet of staff. There is a refinement and a more subtle approach to flavors on this five-course prix fixe menu.

Oiji Mi ©  Christian Harder/Oiji Mi
Oiji Mi © Christian Harder/Oiji Mi

One White Street (Tribeca)
Cuisine: Contemporary
This 19th-century townhouse, has been transformed into a destination of culinary excellence, thanks to chef Austin Johnson and Master Sommelier Dustin Wilson. The lower level operates more like a wine bar with a casual menu and crowds aplenty, while the higher floors offer a seasonal tasting menu starring products sourced from their upstate farm.

One White Street © Gary He/One White Street
One White Street © Gary He/One White Street


Red Paper Clip (Greenwich Village)
Cuisine: Contemporary
Blue Hill at Stone Barns alum Chef Kevin Chen made a name for himself with a series of pop-ups before establishing this stylish Asian-leaning delight. The team's steadfast commitment to local farms is the cornerstone of this kitchen, and seasonal dishes showcase the young chef's Taiwanese heritage and Queens upbringing through a fine-dining lens.

Red Paper Clip © redpaperclipnyc/Instagram
Red Paper Clip © redpaperclipnyc/Instagram

Semma (Greenwich Village)
Cuisine: Indian
Chef Vijay Kumar, most recently of San Francisco's Rasa, switched coasts to run the show at Semma, where regional south Indian cuisine is on full display.

Semma © Paul McDonough/Semma
Semma © Paul McDonough/Semma

Shion 69 Leonard Street (Tribeca)
Cuisine: Japanese/Sushi
Now under the command of Chef Shion Uino, this quiet sushi-ya features prized, beautiful seafood sourced primarily from Japan. The product is whole and luscious every time, which is all the more reason why the nigiri sees little beyond a dot of wasabi and dab of nikiri.

SHION 69 Leonard Street © Douglas Kim/SHION 69 Leonard Street
SHION 69 Leonard Street © Douglas Kim/SHION 69 Leonard Street
63 Clinton (Lower East Side)

Cuisine: Contemporary
Under the calm leadership of chef Samuel Clonts, 63 Clinton is anything but ordinary. In fact, diners can expect a wonderful and surprising meal with an eye towards finesse.

63 Clinton © Giada Paoloni/63 Clinton
63 Clinton © Giada Paoloni/63 Clinton

Torien (Greenwich Village)
Cuisine: Japanese/Yakitori
This sibling to Torishiki in Tokyo arrives to NYC by way of NoHo. Chef/owner Yoshiteru Ikegawa may be found working his skills like a master pianist—turning, fanning, saucing, and brushing. It's a pristine workspace and the menu is a tribute to the yakitori tradition.

Torien © Evan Sung/Torien
Torien © Evan Sung/Torien

Yoshino (Noho)
Cuisine: Japanese/Sushi
Revered Tokyo chef Tadashi “Edowan” Yoshida has landed in NYC. Dinner here serves up an element of theater, so much so that diners will find themselves leaning forward to absorb every detail. The main event though just might be the nigiri

Yoshino © Evan Sung/Yoshino
Yoshino © Evan Sung/Yoshino

Hero image: Semma © Paul McDonough/Semma

Michelin Star Revelation

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