Features 1 minute 14 September 2017

Why Coffee And Wine Are More Similar Than You Think

One is usually enjoyed in the day, and the other at night, but there are more similarities between coffee and wine than you think.

coffee wine

For many, waking up and sipping on a cup of coffee has become habit. For others, winding down the night with a glass of wine is their bedtime ritual. But though they might be enjoyed during day and night respectively, the similarities between coffee and wine go beyond the 100-point scoring system.

Take for instance the concept of variety. Coffee comes in many varieties and is grown in various corners of the world. The variety grown, as well as its ability to grow well in certain terroirs, most certainly affects the coffee’s aromatic and taste profiles. Different varieties, just like grapes, are suited to different terroirs. The type of soil in which the coffee plants grow, sun exposure and other climatic elements all play a role in defining coffee aromas, flavours and textures.
Speaking of aromas and flavours, this is perhaps one of the most obvious similarities. Just like wine, coffee has a unique bouquet of aromas that are specific to its variety, terroir and roasting process—the same can be said for the coffee’s flavours and textures. To speak of the roasting process, the way it affects coffee mimics the way winemaking decisions in the cellar will affect the final outcome of a wine.

And then, there’s the concept of serving. We are all aware of how the right temperature, stemware and proper decanting (if necessary) can significantly affect the way a wine shows—and the same can be said for coffee. How the coffee is ground (to what degree of coarseness or fineness), the temperature of the water used to make the coffee and the device used to prepare the coffee, will all have an affect on its taste. In the same way that it is important to properly prepare and serve wine, it is important to properly prepare and serve coffee to experience it in its best state.
To be sure, wine connoisseurs often end up being coffee connoisseurs too, meaning those discerning enough to spend money on high-end food and wine are likely to drink high-quality coffee as well. In the same way wine lovers want to enjoy highly-rated wines that please their palates, they too want to experience and enjoy the aroma and flavour profiles of the finest coffee in the world.

This article was originally written by Melissa Vogt and first appeared on Robert Parker Wine Advocate in May 2017. Click here for more stories from Wine Journal.

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