Dining Out 5 minutes 11 October 2023

New Additions to MICHELIN Guide New York October 2023

11 flavor packed additions are coming to MICHELIN Guide New York.

New Additions Editor's Pick New York City

MICHELIN Guide Inspectors spend all year on the road uncovering the best restaurants to recommend—and their discoveries are too good to keep secret. Whet your appetite with a sneak peek of the 2023 MICHELIN Guide New York selection featuring eleven new additions spread across New York City.

New York is dubbed as "The Melting Pot of America" for a reason. Home to over 400 MICHELIN Guide restaurants (449 to be exact), the choices for where to eat are literally endless. And with our latest additions like a diner in Crown Heights to Hong Kong cinema inspired restaurants, that choice just got so much harder. 


Agi's Counter
Cuisine: Creative

You have room for one more dish, right? It’s a question that will come up often at this sweet little diner in Crown Heights. Chef Jeremy Salamon takes inspiration (and the restaurant’s name) from his Hungarian grandmother for a delightfully casual but fine-tuned effort. With walls painted cupcake pink, the kitchen has a real talent for bread. The cheddar-flecked biscuit sandwich with speck is an explosive first bite thanks to an expertly fried egg. It’s a good start to any morning, while the confit tuna melt on a superb Pullman loaf hits the spot come afternoon. Yes, there are crepes — thin, delicate and none too sweet — but there’s also cheesecake, chocolate babka and toast smeared in whipped farmer’s cheese and topped with market tomatoes.

Marc Franklin/Agi's Counter
Marc Franklin/Agi's Counter

Apropos Restaurant at The Abbey Inn
Cuisine: American

The Sisters of Saint Mary's certainly didn't eat like this, but if you take a one-hour train ride from Grand Central to Peekskill's Apropros Restaurant at The Abbey Inn, you will. This 120-year-old abbey perched high above the Hudson River has been painstakingly restored and transformed into a lovely inn and restaurant. The grounds, and the views, are worth the trip alone but the wine cellar boasting an impressive collection and the farm-to-table kitchen are equally rewarding.

The menu leans traditional, with dishes ranging from rich lamb ragù atop tangles of thick pappardelle to grilled petite filet of beef finished with a textbook green peppercorn sauce. Pannacotta flavored with moscato and finished with an apricot and chili preserve is a lovely send-off.

Photo: Courtesy of Apropos Restaurant at The Abbey Inn
Photo: Courtesy of Apropos Restaurant at The Abbey Inn

Fasano
Cuisine: Italian

With its restaurants and hotels worldwide, the São Paulo-based Fasano hospitality group will be familiar to discerning travelers; and the setting will be familiar to savvy diners as the short-lived home of the relocated Four Seasons. However, New York's own Fasano restaurant looks poised for longevity offering a dose of sophistication to Midtown's dining scene. The spacious, elegantly arranged dining room looks luxe and feels soothing. The menu honors the gastronomic legacy of northern Italy and offers a range of highly enjoyable preparations. Excellent pasta, like the cappellacci di granseola with its squid ink-tinted pockets stuffed with King crab and saffron-spiked "fumetto," is offered along with Milanese di vitello and ossobuco.

Eric Medsker/Fasano
Eric Medsker/Fasano

Kingfisher
Cuisine: Contemporary

Owners André Hueston Mack and Phoebe Damrosch are building their hospitality portfolio one hotspot at a time, and Kingfisher is the latest installment. With whitewashed brick walls and bare tables, this restaurant has a Nordic-meets-Brooklyn vibe. Chef Nico Bouter is at the helm of this sustainable seafood-focused restaurant where simplicity reigns. One bite of the hamachi with Asian pear and house-made XO sauce and it's clear why this is one of the most ordered openers. Skin-on striped bass is as fresh as it comes, charred ever so slightly, then plated with grilled avocado and tender, springy fava beans. Sweets are limited (think chocolate or butterscotch varieties), but there's always the Farmstead cheese with local honey.

Liz Clayman/Kingfisher
Liz Clayman/Kingfisher

Little Myanmar
Cuisine: Burmese

Husband and wife Thidar Kyaw and Tin Ko Naing along with their daughter, Yun Naing, run this tiny spot with just 14 seats in the East Village. Despite its size, the hospitality is warm and the menu is surprisingly large. Here, Burmese cuisine takes center stage, and there is everything from soup and athokes, or salads, as well as hearty dishes including paratha chicken and curries. Kick off the meal with a delightfully crunchy Burmese pancake filled with vegetables and toasted sesame seeds. For a classic dish, order the fermented tea leaf salad, a vibrant blend of textures and flavors. From there, dig into a soup or noodles, all the while remembering that the flavors are bold and portion sizes are perfect for sharing.

David Wu/Little Myanmar
David Wu/Little Myanmar

Mischa
Cuisine: Contemporary

This latest venture from Chef Alex Stupack serves up some of what Midtown needs now - a pretty but comfortable room offering not just dinner but also lunch; and a bar area pouring creative cocktails at the end of a long day back in the office. Horseradish margarita anyone? Terrazzo flooring and an inviting lounge area lead to a slender dining room furnished with cozy circular booths.
The menu is an intriguing smorgasbord of influences and flavors. A much-buzzed menu signature, the hot dog nestled in a house-made potato bun served with a platter of accompaniments, shares billing with the likes of likes of tuna poke, kasha varnishkes, and seared scallops with creamy rice and XO sauce. The dessert program, led by a longtime lieutenant of the chef, is highly impressive so save room for the buckwheat cake with mascarpone and sunflower seed praline; as well as other treats.

Evan Sung/Mischa
Evan Sung/Mischa

Monsieur Vo
Cuisine: Vietnamese

Husband-and-wife duo, Chef Jimmy Ly and Yen Vo, keep things all in the family. Sister spot Madam Vo was dedicated to the women in their family, so it's only fitting that Monsieur Vo is a nod to their fathers, uncles and brothers. This corner spot in the East Village is a meat-centric, modern gastropub riffing on familiar favorites and reimagining them with a Vietnamese twist (spy the bahn mi board with pate and pickled veggies or dry-style pho noodles with shredded chicken thigh and crispy chicken skin). Bring the whole crew to tuck in to dishes like a beef shank sized for sharing, then enjoy exciting menu items like the decadent bone marrow finished with a tamarind glaze and a toasted baguette slice.

Andrew Bui/Monsieur Vo
Andrew Bui/Monsieur Vo

Peppercorn Station
Cuisine: Chinese

This particular stretch of road that runs along the southern edge of Bryant Park sports an unusual number of Sichuan restaurants. Among them, Peppercorn Station is easy to spot, standing out with its cheery, brightly lit interior. The menu runs a decent length and offers a comfortable collection of favorites designed for sharing. Fish fillet with pickled cabbage is a must-order with its golden, numbing broth, as is the mapo tofu that’s been turbo-charged with fermented black beans. Sliced pork belly with garlic-chili sauce is a classic starter. Far from aggressive, this efficient kitchen is fairly even keeled when it comes to chilis and spice levels, and seasons just enough to nudge the sinuses. The restaurant has a second location in Jersey City.

Photo: Courtesy of Peppercorn Station
Photo: Courtesy of Peppercorn Station

Potluck Club
Cuisine: Chinese

Chrystie Street wins big with this high-energy Chinese restaurant that is always down to have a good time. The stylish room leans on a Hong Kong cinema motif with posters and stills from famous flicks. Further down, a movie marquee hangs above the chef’s counter. Looks aside, the cooking offers a fresh take on Cantonese favorites using top-rate products. Pan-seared pot stickers get their boost from a Berkshire pork and chive filling. Fried tiger shrimp slicked in mayonnaise has never been more appealing. Also worth an order is the salt and pepper fried chicken. The platter comes with fluffy scallion biscuits and a chili-plum jam that should be bottled and sold commercially.

Paulsta/Potluck Club
Paulsta/Potluck Club

Torrisi
Cuisine: Contemporary

There is perfection in the details at Torrisi, where waiters are crisply dressed in dinner jackets and tables are draped in pressed linens, but the buzzy warmth is as charming as the good looks. Nestled inside the landmark Puck Building, this highly imaginative restaurant expertly balances the creative and the familiar. Nothing feels copied or contrived, and while some of the dishes may seem familiar, they've all been revamped with panache. An armada of chefs caters to excited diners who feast on items like the escarole and endive salad and chicken stracciatella soup with textbook chicken broth, fluffy egg and savory meatballs. It's the boule, baked, finished on the grill and filled with dreamy clams, that's pure aromatic bliss.

Evan Sung/Torrisi
Evan Sung/Torrisi

Superiority Burger
Cuisine: Vegetarian

What began with a handful of seats and vegetarian burgers has evolved with a new location and new menu. Brooks Headley's first-come, first-served spot, with vintage diner vibes, is squarely in the middle of the East Village and the new menu is equal parts quirky and contemporary, and fully vegetarian (even sometimes vegan). It's very creative, as in sweet and sour beets over jalapeño cream cheese and pretzels. Yes, it sounds weird, but it works. Cabbage filled with sticky rice and oyster mushrooms has plenty of character, and the burger crafted from quinoa, chickpeas, carrots and walnuts is how they made their name. All of the desserts are worth trying, especially the peanut butter pie and the seared malt cake with house-made cream cheese gelato that punches way above its weight.


Hero image: Eric Medsker/Fasano

Thumbnail image: Eric Medsker/Fasano


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