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Dining Out 2 minutes 27 June 2019

5 Restaurants In Hong Kong For Instagram-worthy Desserts

The camera eats first at these sweet establishments where the desserts are as photogenic as they are delicious.

dessert Hong Kong

Contemporary dining culture dictates that many dishes — especially desserts — have to not only conquer our palate; they need to also pull on our heartstrings with their ethereal presentation. A good amount of restaurants further extend this aesthetic ideal to the dining space. Their impeccable décor often make diners feel compelled to take their eyes off the food in front for a moment, and instead take a snapshot of the surroundings to share it on social media.

These five restaurants do a fantastic job in this regard. The desserts they serve verge on art, amazing both our eyes and taste buds.
The al fresco dining area at Cobo House is a great photo spot with lots of natural light.
The al fresco dining area at Cobo House is a great photo spot with lots of natural light.

Eye Candy At COBO HOUSE
Beyond its minimalist, Korean-chic look, one of the restaurant’s biggest attractions lies in its dessert bar counter, at which the desserts are crafted right in front of your eyes. From production to tasting, it’s a multisensory kind of pleasure. Cobo House makes an artwork out of every dessert. No detail is too small: its signature items like Soufflé on the Pan and Soybean Tiramisu stand out for their visual impact. Pop Mountain is another surprise — a sweet towering cone is constructed with corn-flavoured ice cream, laid with popcorn on the surface. How can you not post this on Instagram?

Van Gogh Senses’ desserts are colourful like the moving artworks of the Dutch painter.
Van Gogh Senses’ desserts are colourful like the moving artworks of the Dutch painter.
A Taste Of Art At Van Gogh Senses
Located at 1881 in Tsim Sha Tsui, Van Gogh Senses shows us a new way to appreciate the artworks of the Dutch master. It is an experiential artistic space based on Vincent van Gogh, the first of its kind in the world to be authorised by the Van Gogh Museum. Naturally, the space and food both evoke the aesthetics of the painter. For instance, Petite Caramel Sunflowers pays homage to the painting Sunflowers. The yellow cream on the sponge cake mimics the broad brushstrokes of oil paint. Among the other artsy sweet creations are Classic Red Velvet and Midnight Passion, and their exquisite tastes enough to win over even the non-art lovers.
The setting of Spiga takes patrons to the set of a romantic movie.
The setting of Spiga takes patrons to the set of a romantic movie.

Cinematic Flair At Spiga
A cinematic air penetrates Spiga. Through the floor tiles, lighting and decorative accents, it sends diners back to Italy in the 1950s. Authentic Italian cooking is at the heart of restaurant’s philosophy, with certain modern tropes keeping its cuisine exciting. The desserts reflect the romantic disposition of the surroundings. The Chocolate Foam with Hazelnut Ice Cream and Tiramisu are both spectacular. Their classy presentation is surely made for nostalgia seekers.

The unconventional décor at Jamie’s Italian in Tsim Sha Tsui is exemplified by the history-themed graffiti.
The unconventional décor at Jamie’s Italian in Tsim Sha Tsui is exemplified by the history-themed graffiti.

Caramel Indulgence At Jamie’s Italian
The Italian restaurant opened in Tsim Sha Tsui by Jamie Oliver is more than spacious, measuring at an expanse of 6,000 square feet. You might not expect the ceiling of the main dining area to be painted with graffiti that tells you about the history of Hong Kong since colonial times. Besides pasta and pizza, the joint’s strong suit is its Epic Chocolate Brownie, topped with salted caramel ice cream and caramelised popcorn for additional flavour and texture. The magic moment comes as the ice cream starts to melt and coats the warm brownie, prompting patrons to quickly take a snapshot before dive right in.

Bask in sweet nostalgia as you eat the Baked Alaska at Jimmy’s Kitchen.
Bask in sweet nostalgia as you eat the Baked Alaska at Jimmy’s Kitchen.

Classic Sweet Treat At Jimmy’s Kitchen
Opened since 1928, Jimmy’s Kitchen spent most of its tenure in colonial Hong Kong, which explains why it carries a palpable museum-like aura. For the older generation to whom a Western dinner was very much a luxury affair, Jimmy’s Kitchen is the institution that stands for the old Western dining culture. The refined interior is frozen in time, just as its popular dessert Baked Alaska. When it is served, the server would pour rum on the meringue and set it on fire. A picture taken by the diners is the best reminder of the city’s good old days.


This story is written by Joe Chan and translated by Vincent Leung. Click here to read the original article.

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