Miami Beach

Best Japanese Restaurants in Miami

5 Restaurants
Pull up a chair for sushi (both high-end and wallet-friendly, but always exquisite), Hokkaido milk bread with umami-rich butter, and thinly-sliced octopus with orange miso.
Updated on 08 September 2022
Kojin
8222 NE. 2nd Ave., 33138 Miami
Japanese

Diners may get going here with sumac-topped, braised kabocha squash set over a purée of butternut-pumpkin seeds, as well as Hokkaido milk bread with umami-rich butter. Smoked steelhead trout sports pickled ginger for zest; while chawanmushi flaunts a global accent with chives and truffles. For dessert, milk pudding with sake gelée is virtually unmissable.

Hiyakawa Miami
2700 N. Miami Ave., 33127 Miami
Japanese
150 - 200 USD

Is there a dining room cooler than Hiyakawa’s? Probably not. Modern art hangs throughout the space that is art itself, with the sushi counter and tables under an arch of backlit, undulating wood slats. From Hokkaido scallops to Scottish salmon, top-quality seafood flown in from across the world meets creative flourishes like cured egg yolk and Okinawa salt. Most diners, though, go à la carte as it's more flexible (read: affordable) and features a broader range of items such as soups, tempura and grilled meats.

Sushi Yasu Tanaka
140 NE. 39th St., 33137 Miami
Japanese
23 - 60 USD

Advanced bookings, high price tags and dinner-only appear to be the usual foundations for sushiyas these days. Thank goodness then for chef Yasu Tanaka, who brings his celebrated skills to this casual corner inside the MIA Market in the heart of the Design District. Nigiri is the sole focus of his carte, offered in multiple sets, made with top-quality fish flown in several times a week and adorned with clever garnishes. Exquisite bites, such as hotate with chimichurri and ebi dusted with lime zes, arrive in a flash so that speedy diners can be out the door in under 20 minutes.

m
Hiden
313 NW. 25th St., 33127 Miami
Japanese
250 USD

This spot is indeed hidden in the thick of bustling Wynwood. The steel front door is not easy to find and it only slides open with a time-sensitive passcode, but beyond the mysterious proceedings, a rewarding experience awaits for just a few fortunate guests at this eight-seat counter.
Chef Shingo Akikuni sticks to tradition, sourcing most of his product from Japan and adorning his nigiri with little more than a dab of nikiri. Beautiful slabs of tuna, sweet botan ebi and generous portions of uni are highlights in a tasting menu that never feels stuffy or overly reverent.

m
The Den at Azabu Miami Beach
161 Ocean Dr., 33139 Miami Beach
Japanese
220 USD

Fish flown in a few times a week is treated and dressed minimally here, often with just a single brush of nikiri. And whereas some counters can come off a little too earnest, the itamae here are a friendly bunch who are happy to answer questions and accommodate special requests. Recent highlights have included thinly sliced octopus dotted with a sunny orange miso as well as soy-marinated akami nigiri.