Feedback

The 10 Best Dim Sum Dishes in Michelin-Starred Hong Kong Restaurants

We rounded up our favorite dim sum delights from 11 Michelin-starred restaurants in Hong Kong.
Share
Few Hongkongers let a week go by without having dim sum. While it originated in Guangzhou, it was Hong Kong that made dim sum trendy in the international food scene; the culinary tradition features so many choices, cooking techniques and ingredients that has earned fans left and right, both in Hong Kong and overseas.

Every dim sum pilgrim has a favorite item of their own, so we hunted down the best places that are renowned for various dishes. Here's where to go on your next visit to Hong Kong.
Shrimp dumplings from Shang Palace.
Shrimp dumplings from Shang Palace.

Shrimp Dumplings: Shang Palace

The shrimp dumpling is, without a doubt, the most iconic dish in Cantonese dim sum, and Shang Palace’s version is unrivaled. On top of the freshness of the shrimp, the dumpling is a winner with a dumpling skin thinner than one millimeter and contains the optimal proportion of shrimp and fatty pork (600 grams of shrimp to 37 grams of pork). With just the right amount of steaming time, the end result is a shrimp dumpling with a lot of body, springiness and oozing with sweet pork juices.

Soft-boiled quail egg and pork dumpling in shrimp broth and topped with caviar at Duddell’s.
Soft-boiled quail egg and pork dumpling in shrimp broth and topped with caviar at Duddell’s.

Siu Mai: Duddell’s and Tin Lung Heen

Quail egg siu mai is very difficult to make, yet it’s something Duddell’s does with exceptional precision. Its dumplings have fresh shrimp as well as shrimp broth in the pork filling, which wraps a soft-boiled quail egg that is cooked just right.

As for modern interpretations, Tin Lung Heen makes an impression with its steamed spotted grouper dumpling with coriander. The grouper lends the dish much refinement and umami, while the addition of squid and cured ham adds chewiness to the siu mai.

Baked barbecue pork buns at Tim Ho Wan.
Baked barbecue pork buns at Tim Ho Wan.

Barbecue Pork Bun: Tim Ho Wan

The soft, volcano-shaped barbecue pork bun made with long-matured dough leaves a mark on first-time diners. Nowadays, many restaurants prepare both the barbecue pork bun and its crunchier baked spin-off. The innovative dish is made famous by Tim Ho Wan and the recipe is simple—the barbecue pork is mixed with oyster sauce and stuffed inside the bun, and it is baked with a layer of puff pastry on top. The most vital part to the dish is to serve it fresh, when the puff pastry is still crunchy and breaks up easily with a bite. Due to the high demand, the buns at Tim Ho Wan are constantly being made.

Stir-fried rice flour rolls with X.O. sauce at T’ang Court.
Stir-fried rice flour rolls with X.O. sauce at T’ang Court.

Cheung Fan: T’ang Court

Cheung fan, or rice flour rolls, are made from a rice flour batter, and are yet another Cantonese staple that is available at the most premium restaurants and humble tea restaurants. Traditional cheung fan has fillings like barbecue pork or shrimp steamed with the batter and later rolled to the finished form. In comparison, its younger sibling, the stir-fried rice roll, demonstrates a different texture and flavor.

T’ang Court prepares every component of the stir-fried rice flour rolls with X.O. sauce in its kitchen. The X.O. sauce incorporates various kinds of deluxe seafood that are made well ahead of time. The rice rolls are freshly steamed every day with dried shrimp and spring onions, before pan-fried with a generous amount of X.O. sauce until golden. With that sensational sauce enveloping every side of every roll, no condiments are required.

Steamed Sicilian shrimp and minced pork dumpling at Spring Moon.
Steamed Sicilian shrimp and minced pork dumpling at Spring Moon.

Xiao Long Bao: Spring Moon

Shanghainese xiao long bao has been adopted by most Cantonese dim sum restaurants nowadays. A well-made dumpling should have a soft and thin skin that carries a good amount of broth and pork and shrimp filling. But Spring Moon goes beyond this standard, employing Sicilian red shrimp to create a broth bursting with the sweetness of seafood. The balanced pork-to-shrimp proportion is also worth praising.

Braised whole abalone and seafood on a crispy taro net at Yan Toh Heen.
Braised whole abalone and seafood on a crispy taro net at Yan Toh Heen.

Taro Dumpling: Yan Toh Heen

Made with deep-fried taro mash and stuffed with different fillings, the taro dumpling is not served in many dim sum destinations due to the lengthy cooking process. Yan Toh Heen’s version boasts a shining lineup of fillings—abalone and other types of seafood accentuate the effort and technique put into preparing this crispy classic.

Baked whole abalone puff with diced chicken at Lung King Heen.
Baked whole abalone puff with diced chicken at Lung King Heen.

Abalone Puff: Lung King Heen

Savory dim sum pastries have been gaining favor recently—without the boundary of tradition, it's an area where dim sum chefs can assert their creativity. The abalone puff that we have come to know and love was invented by chef Chan Yan Tak at Lung King Heen. While a traditional abalone puff doesn’t actually contain abalone, Chan is inspired by Chinese wedding cakes and uses canned 15-head South African abalone as the star of the dish. The flaky butter puff base carries diced chicken and mushroom, providing a delicious backdrop to the succulent abalone.

Steamed vegetarian dumplings at Summer Palace.
Steamed vegetarian dumplings at Summer Palace.

Teochew Dumpling: Summer Palace

Steamed dumplings in dim sum is a large and varied family, and the teochew dumpling thrives on a wider mix of ingredients compared to the shrimp dumpling. A diner's favorite, the steamed vegetarian dumpling at Summer Palace puts together finely-sliced king trumpet mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms, button mushrooms, diced carrots and water chestnuts in its filling. Another ingenious touch is replacing peanuts with Indian almonds, giving the dumpling a more special fragrance.

Huadiao chicken feet at Ming Court.
Huadiao chicken feet at Ming Court.

Chicken Feet: Ming Court

As a dim sum dish, chicken feet can go to two extremes: one served hot, deep-fried and steamed with oyster sauce and soy sauce; the other, a more subtle version, belongs to the Guangzhou-style, and is served cold after steaming. Ming Court’s creation belongs to the latter category. The cooked chicken feet are soaked in vintage Shaoxing wine for more than six hours, and then refrigerated for another three hours until the chicken feet fully absorb the wine’s aroma. On top of the rich taste of Shaoxing, the bouncy texture of the skin is a winner.

Beef tenderloin puff with black pepper sauce at Man Wah.
Beef tenderloin puff with black pepper sauce at Man Wah.

Beef Puff: Man Wah 

Man Wah’s beef tenderloin puff is a step forward from the '90s invention of the turnip puff pastry. The turnip puff originated from Mainland China as a marriage between the Shanghainese and Cantonese pastry-making techniques. The pastry is admired for its intricacy, like in croissants, with each layer being laid out clearly. Man Wah replaces turnip with Australian wagyu that is seasoned with tangy black pepper. The multifold puff pastry is charming on its own with a buttery aroma and airy texture. It also makes for a perfect accompaniment to the piping hot beef filling.

This article was written by Emily Tong and translated by Vincent Leung. Click here to read the original version of this story.

Share on:
Subscribe to the Michelin Guide Newsletter
Stay on top of best Restaurants, Lifestyle, Events recommended in your city.